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HEI Landscape Analysis

The following section will account for the various HEI statistics based on the overall count of HEIs, Open/Dual Programmes, Private Institutions and the impact of these on planning the way forward for the Indian higher education.
OVERALL INSTITUTIONS
Currently, India has over 51,000 HEIs, the split of which is as follows: Universities – 993 Colleges – 39,931 Standalone Institutions – 10,725

Given the diversity in our institutions and challenges faced by them, Indian HEIs cannot rely on a one-size-fits-all strategy.

Inference: Given the large number of institutions, we will have to appreciate the associated diversity and acknowledge that we will need to build Academic Continuity Plans (ACPs) to suit the breadth of diversity, and therefore, there may not be a standardised one-size-fits-all approach. However, based on the commonality of various resources required across institutions, centralised resource management can help streamline operations and reduce the associated costs. Therefore, this will require complex administration to ensure effective planning and implementation.

OPEN/ DUAL PROGRAMMES
  • As per the AISHE Report 2018-2019, of all the institutions, currently the count of Open Universities is as follows – 1 Central Open University, 1 State Private Open University, 14 State Open Universities
  • 110 are Dual Mode Universities
Inference: Most institutions operate physically and will require a strategy for academic continuity during COVID-19
UNDERSTANDING PRIVATE HEI LANDSCAPE
  • 385/993 (38.8%) universities are privately managed
  • 8% of the colleges are privately managed – 64.3% are private unaided, and 13.5% are private aided
UNDERSTANDING PRIVATE HEI LANDSCAPE
  • 385/993 (38.8%) universities are privately managed
  • 8% of the colleges are privately managed – 64.3% are private unaided, and 13.5% are private aided

Inference: A large proportion of the HEIs are privately managed. The financial implications of the pandemic may be severe for them as they are self-funded and depend on student tuition fees which in turn may be constrained in itself by the financial implications of the pandemic across all households. HEIs will need to identify cost-effective strategies to continue the education programmes, and develop an academic continuity strategy and implementation which does not add to their financial burden, and identify innovative funding tools to ensure continuity. Any negative consequences arising from constrained financial health of these private HEIs will have implications for millions of students currently enrolled in these institutions. Therefore, the government and the regulators might consider extending their support to private HEIs as well.

Given the large number of institutions, we will have to appreciate the associated diversity and acknowledge that we will need to build Academic Continuity Plans (ACPs) to suit the breadth of diversity.